Volcano entrance

Up to the land of Pele

 

Up to the house in the clouds we drive,  to the place where volcano’s rise. Pele’s fire burns deep inside, from the Kilauea Crater, steam and smoke fill the sky!

Rainbows everyday

 

 

The Kilauea Iki Crater Trail overlook was the first place we went to see. It was misting that afternoon and we were afraid that the hiking might not be very good. To our surprise, rainbows appeared right before our very eyes. We had prepared with rain gear and hiking boots, layers and hats-which all came in handy, but never did we feel put out by the weather. Every time we ventured towards our desired destination, magic happened.

Overlook Iki Trail

 

The trail is a 4 mile loop that is well worth the work out. In the crater we were immersed in a world of new born earth, observing the pushing up of steam, plant life, colors, minerals and heat that makes up this beautiful planet.

 

 

Iki Altar

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yummy

 

Rainbow shadows

 

Rainbow striations decorate the stone in multi-colored rocks and earth art.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Lehua Tree

 

 

The Lehua Blossoms look like fireworks of living art straight from Pele’s lava sparks!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Looking out from Jagger Museum into the crater of fire.

 

Flaming colors filled the gray sky on the day we visited the Jagger Museum.  I felt the power of Madame Pele. You can hear cracking rock, bursts and pops coming from inside of this crater. Pele, she is the Hawaiian goddess of Volcanoes and this is her residence; where her fires burn and smoke rises from the Kilauea Crater. Here the sky glows deep pink, red and orange at night, and on some occasions there are bursts of lava from the crater. It is fascinating!

The Hawaiian Islands are made up from this powerful force, seen here at Volcanoes. They are “Born of the fire, Born of the sea”.

 

 

No doors over the lava flow

 

 

I was so psyched to fly in a helicopter without any doors. We could feel the heat from the lava flow beneath us as the chopper dipped down and circled around the molten river. It was a little scary!

 

 

 

 

Red river glow

 

 

 

 

The culmination of all that hot lava reaches its cool climactic fall here, at Holei Sea Arch, along the Puna coast. Waves at Holei….

Lava formed cliffs at Holei

 

 

 

 

 

The Kilauea Lodge is a historical spot to visit in Volcanoes. The place is covered in lush trees and gardens. Birds are singing everywhere, and the food is excellent. We were starving after a long day of hiking and driving around the park. Best meal in Volcanoes. I could tell there were people from all over the world sitting together in this dining room. There was the after Christmas good cheer still in the air, and families were really glowing. It felt like the world was at peace here.

A great meal

 

Kilauea Lodge at dinnertime.Here’s a shot of Peter, full of good cheer.
 

Singing to the Valley

 

 

 

She's the Goddess of this land

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pololu Valley Lookout is at the end of the lava road. Here, I pulled out a blanket and sat on the wall, overlooking the valley and the sea. A shimmering mist of color surrounded us. Peace and complete well being swelled from the sea, and the lull eased me into my ukelele. I started writing the song for Volcanoes at this spot. Pele was whispering it to me in the wind, and I could feel her influence on my emotions. I started singing and when I stopped people clapped their hands and started giving me more ideas for the song. It was a moment I’ll never forget. All of the information I had gathered from reading, eating, breathing, hiking and experiencing the park, all came thru me like a flow of lava made out of love and burst out into a song.

To Pele, the goddess of Volcanoes. Thank you for your inspiration. There is so much more to see. I will surely be returning back to Big Island and Volcanoes National Park.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1 comment

Hawai?i Volcanoes National Park is a fascinating world of active volcanism, biological diversity, and Hawaiian culture, past and present.

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